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JANUARY 2012

 

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HELPING CONSUMERS UNDERSTAMD AND USE HEALTH INSURANCE IN 2014 

 

Teaching Tips for Children and

Adults with Autism

Temple Grandin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA

Good teachers helped me to achieve success. I was able to overcome autism because I had good teachers. At age 2 1/2 I wasplaced in a structured nursery school with experienced teachers.

From an early age I was taught to have good manners and tobehave at the dinner table. Children with autism need to have a structured day, and teachers who know how to be firm but gentle. Between the ages of 2 1/4 and 5 my day was structured, and I was not allowed to tune out. I had 45 minutes of one-to-one speech therapy five days a week, and my mother hired a nanny who spent three to four hours a day playing games with me and my sister. She taught 'turn taking' during play activities.

When we made a snowman, she had me roll the bottom ball; and then my sister had to make the next part. At meal times, every-body ate together; and I was not allowed to do any "stimss." The only time I was allowed to revert back to autistic behavior was during a one-hour rest period after lunch. The combination of the nursery school, speech therapy, play activities, and "miss manners" meals added up to 40 hours a week, where my brain was kept connected to the world.

See our newsletter for a list of tips from Temple Grandin.

 

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